A Review of the 2016-2017 Flu Season: Guidelines, Costs, and Barriers

Authors

  • Simone Chinnis MSN/DNP Candidate, May 2017 College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina Adjunct Clinical Assistant College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina
  • James Sterrett South Carolina College of Pharmacy
  • Richetta Deas Roper St. Francis
  • Whitney Smith Medical University of South Carolina
  • Ruth Conner College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14574/ojrnhc.v17i1.428

Abstract

In the United States (US), about 50,000 influenza-related deaths occur annually (Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services [CMS], 2014).  The most important preventive measure for the influenza virus is for people to obtain the influenza vaccine (Varsha et al., 2014; Uyeki, 2014).  Of note, the vaccine is often underutilized; however, the influenza vaccine is recommended as an annual part of preventive care for people who are >6 months of age (United States Government of Health and Human Services, 2015; Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention [CDC], 2016; World Health Organization [WHO], 2016). The under-vaccination of patients with the influenza vaccine is a profound issue, especially in rural communities, which is defined as locations populated by fewer than 50,000 people (United States Census Bureau [U.S. Census Bureau], 2015).  In West Virginia, for example, a state where 38% of the population resides in rural areas, people who were insured by Medicare and whose insurance records did not manifest that they received the influenza vaccine, possessed a 170% increased risk of death during the influenza season in comparison to those who did receive the influenza vaccine (Schade & McCombs, 2000).  This literature review discusses the increased need for influenza vaccination in rural communities; reviews the 2016-2017 influenza season's guidelines and costs; and in preparation for the 2017-2018 influenza season, the need to overcome barriers that are associated with influenza vaccination.

Keywords: Rural, Influenza, Flu, Flu Shot, Flushot, Influenza Vaccine, Guidelines, Costs

DOI:  http://dx.doi.org/10.14574/ojrnhc.v17i1.428  

Author Biographies

Simone Chinnis, MSN/DNP Candidate, May 2017 College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina Adjunct Clinical Assistant College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina

Simone Chinnis, MBA, RN

Simone Chinnis is currently a part-time student in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at the Medical Univeristy of South Carolina's College of Nursing, working part-time as an ambulatory float nurse at an academic medical center and undergraduate clinical instructor at the College of Nursing at the Medical University of South Carolina.  Her academic background consists of a BS in Spanish and Health Exercise Science from Furman University and a Master of Busines Administration with a focus in Health Services. She possesses over eleven years of experience in nursing, working in various positions--e.g. research, staff, pediatric, education, and occupational health nursing.  Additionally, she worked in management.  Ms. Chinnis belongs to the following professional organizations: Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Society, American Medical College of Quality, American Association of Nurse Practitioners (Student), Primary Care Progress, Institute for Primary Care, and the Rural Nurse Organization. Her passion is in education, health care quality improvement, rural health, interprofessional collaboration, and working towards eliminating health disparities.

James Sterrett, South Carolina College of Pharmacy

James J. Sterrett, Pharm D.

Dr. Sterrett received his initial pharmacy training from the University of SC in 1995 and his post B.S. PharmD from the Medical University of SC in 1997.  He has a variety of pharmacy experience including independent, chain, hospital, academic and family medicine pharmacy practice.  He currently is in charge of the Community Practice Lab at the SC College of Pharmacy.  He also has his own medication education and consulting company specializing in diabetes care.  He received his certification as a diabetes educator in 2000 and BCPS in 2001.  He also has instructor status with the APhA diabetes and immunization certificate training programs.

Richetta Deas, Roper St. Francis

Richetta Deas, MSN, APRN, ANP-BC

Richetta Deas is a board certified Adult Nurse Practitioner.  She graduated Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the Medical University of South Carolina and obtained a Master of Science in Nursing from the University of South Carolina.  She currently works in an interdisciplinary role in case management and utilization review for Roper St. Francis.  Her former positions consisted of working as a provider for over seven years with rural populations in both outpatient and in-patient settings. She is currently a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society, Otolaryngology Nurses Association, and a Selected Committee Member for the Task Force for the South Carolina Office of Rural Health.


Whitney Smith, Medical University of South Carolina

Whitney Smith, MSN, APRN, ANP-BC;GNP-BC

Whitney Smith is a board certified Adult and Gerontologic Nurse Practitioner and an Instructor in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program at the College of Nursing.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from the University of South Florida, Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the Medical University of South Carolina, and a Master of Science in Nursing from the Medical University of South Carolina.  She is certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as an Adult Nurse Practitioner.  Ms. Smith has experience in geriatric medicine, primary care, and women’s health.  Her interests include chronic illness management, age related illnesses, and wellness promotion.

Ruth Conner, College of Nursing Medical University of South Carolina

Ruth Conner, PhD, FNP-BC

Ruth Conner is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the Medical University of South Carolina.  She teaches in both the undergraduate and graduate programs.  She received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from Clemson University and a Master’s Degree as a Family Nurse Practitioner from the Medical University of South Carolina.  She is currently certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner.  Dr. Conner is a graduate of the Ph.D. program at the Medical University of South Carolina, College of Nursing.  Ruthie is a member of the Gamma Omicron Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society for Nursing, Southern Nursing Research Society, National League for Nursing, and South Carolina League for Nursing. 

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Published

2017-05-02

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Articles